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Steve W - Three ships go sailing by
Steve W - Three ships go sailing by

An oak base with ships in pine, beech and purple heart woods

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Richard's hump back whale whale
Richard's hump back whale whale

A real sense of movement in this cherry carved creature of the ocean.

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Dancer carved in lime by Meriel Brown
Dancer carved in lime by Meriel Brown

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Steve W - Three ships go sailing by
Steve W - Three ships go sailing by

An oak base with ships in pine, beech and purple heart woods

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Shropshire Woodcarvers are  back in action

Every Thursday evening in term time at Mary Webb School 7 - 9pm

The second Saturday of each month 10am - 5pm at the same venue

 

 

Stewart's spoon.jpg

 

The Queen's 70 year Jubilee

 

Love Spoon project challenge

 

Anna Turner Lord Lieutenant of Shropshire visited Shropshire Woodcarvers on Thursday 5 May to view the Queen's Jubilee spoons carved by the group

                                                     

                                                   

lord-Lieutenant with Club Members
lord-Lieutenant with Club Members

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lord-Lieutenant with Stewart Tilley Club 2 Chairman
lord-Lieutenant with Stewart Tilley Club 2 Chairman

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Stewart's splendid spoon
Stewart's splendid spoon

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lord-Lieutenant with Club Members
lord-Lieutenant with Club Members

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Stewart's spoon.jpg

Members of Shropshre Woodcarvers hard at work in the Mary Webb School workshops

Retired professional woodcarver Mike Painter accepts honorary membership of the club and agrees to provide advice and guidance on woodcarving at selected monthly Saturday workshops. The most recent session was on how to carve eyes. Mike will return for a follow up session at the club's May meeting.

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Mick's obsession with carving spoons continues

 

Mick uses lime or spalted lime for his spoons and uses a mix of ground coffee and sunflower for the finish. He has used the technique of KOLROSING to pattern some of his spoons and will be giving a demonstration and workshop of this method at the June Saturday session.

 

Mick explains that Kolrosing is basically tattooing wood, a sharp knife is used to incise the design into your subject be it wood. jewellery or any carving requiring the application of fine detail. Once the design is cut it can be stained with various pigments. Traditionally coal dust mixed with oil was a staple for hundreds of years, more recently cinnamon or coffee finely ground and mixed with oil is a good alternative. The coffee leaves a dark brown finish whilst the cinnamon results in a very dark black stain. 

The origin of kolrosing is a Scandinavian (long dark winter nights!) art and is a close 'relative' of scrimshaw which is scribing designs into bones and ivory.

FREEDOM

View the contributions to Stewart's Freedom carving challenge set at the beginning of the first lockdown in March. Further contributions welcome

This end piece comes from the Western Australian Guild of Carvers most recent copy of Chips courtesy of Bob Svendsen October 2020

 

Ready to snap?
 

Life can get a bit much at times. Occasionally, you just need to find something to take your mind off all the worries and give yourself a deserved break from life’s travails. It doesn’t help that this can stunt your creativity when you may well need it to move forward in life. One way you can achieve this is by picking up a piece of wood and decent knife and begin carving. If you didn’t know it already; there is something about creative activities that will place you in a relaxed zone and clear your mind of stressful thoughts. Woodworking or wood carving can be described as a “Whole-Brain” activity as it makes use of both the practical side of your brain in trying to realise what the creative mind has come up with. Also described as a state of “Flow” by psychologist Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi , a perfect immersive state of balance

between skill and challenge, whilst using your body to make it happen.